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“I do everything that every other normal kid does, except on the side I’m training to become an astronaut and go to Mars.” Meet 15-year-old Alyssa Carson who, from age 3, has had her sights set on becoming the first human on the Red Planet as part of NASA’s mission for 2033. Since, she’s been doing everything she mentally and physically can to go on the greatest space adventure in history… even knowing she might not come back. But for this extraordinary teen the “the rewards far outweigh the dangers and risks.”

“The way doors have opened for her, it is definitely destiny working its hand that this kid is meant to go to Mars.” – Bert Carson, Alyssa’s father

Alyssa’s prep for fulfilling her lifelong dream is a comprehensive mind and body experience that’s nothing short of jaw dropping. She’s the youngest to ever graduate from the Advanced Space Academy – the highest level of astronaut initiation, she was the first person to complete all NASA’s space camps in the world, she got her rocket license before her driver’s permit, she earned her basic SCUBA certification and is working on her advanced, she’s taking college level classes through the International Baccalaureate program and studying in 4 languages – English, French, Spanish and Chinese.

The determined 10th grader is also the youngest person ever to be selected to PoSSUM Academy, which preps people for space flight. Upon completion, Alyssa will be certified to go to space. What’s more her name is already on the Wall of Honor at the Air and Space Museum in Virginia… and she’s only 15.

So watch her story, be inspired, have your mind blown, and feel good knowing that the future of our planet and our civilization is in the most excellent hands when there are girls like Alyssa Carson and 12-year-old Taylor Richardson and now 18-year-old Abigail “Astronaut Abby” Harrison who are willing to do what most could never even fathom.

You can follow Alyssa’s journey on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

 

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