By John Marcotte, Founder, Heroic Girls – NBA All-Star Stephen Curry is a staunch advocate for equal rights for women. The basketball champion and father of two daughters has even gone as far as to write an essay on women’s equality for Father’s Day titled This Is Personal.

He’s the real deal.

So when 9-year-old Golden State Warriors fan and aspiring basketball player Riley Morrison visited the Under Armor website and discovered that Curry’s “Curry 5” basketball sneakers were not offered for girls, she was understandably upset. But instead of waiting for the world to be better, Riley decided to make it better.

She wrote a letter.

“I know you support girl athletes because you host an all girls basketball camp,” Morrison wrote. “I hope you can work with Under Armour to change this because girls want to rock the Curry 5s too.”

Her father posted the letter to Instagram, where Vox Media’s Liz Plank noticed it and reposted it to Twitter — tagging Curry. This morning, Curry responded, apologizing for the mistake in classification and promising to work with Under Armor to fix the problem immediately. He also is personally sending Riley a pair of Curry 5s and promised a pair of the yet-to-be-released Curry 6s when they are available. And he invited Riley to Oakland on March 8th for International Women’s Day, when he hinted that there will be “something special in the works.”

Stephen Curry is a feminist and a class act all the way around. But he isn’t the hero of this story. The hero is a 9-year-old Riley Morrison, who saw a small injustice in the world and instead of accepting it, decided to try and fix it.

We should all be more like Riley.

This piece originally ran on Heroic Girls and is republished here with the express permission of John Marcotte.


About The Author

John Marcotte is a writer, TEDx Speaker and activist living in Sacramento with his two super-heroic daughters and wife. He is the founder of Heroic Girls, an organization dedicated to empowering girls by advocating for strong role models in alternative media — particularly comics. John and his team aim to get more girls and women involved in the creation and consumption of comic books as a tool to increase assertiveness and self-esteem, and to help them to dream big.